Kuala Lumpur

Kuala Lumpur is the capital of Malaysia. From its centralized position which spans 243.6 sq. kilometres, this ultra-modern nerve centre of Malaysia expands outwards to embrace the world.

Discovering KL (as locals affectionately call it) is like travelling through a time tunnel. Here, vivid traces of history continue to influence and inspire a country set on becoming a fully industrialized nation by the year 2020.You will see ultra-modern skyscrapers standing magnificently next to rows and rows of quaint old shophouses. Haute cuisine beside hawker stalls.

To the avid shopper, KL is paradise. From world-renowned designer labels and brands to exquisite made-in-Malaysia items, the highly competitive environment that exists among traders is a blessing in disguise to shoppers. While department stores practice a fixed price policy, bargain hunters can test their skills at smaller retail establishments or at any one of KL's famous night markets. KL will enthrall you. It will capture your heart and mind in a way no other city will

Climate

Malaysia is a tropical paradise situated 7 degrees north of the Equator. The climate is warm and humid throughout the year with cooler temperatures in the hill resorts. Temperatures range from 21 degrees Centigrade to 32 degrees Centigrade. Average annual rainfall varies from 2,000 mm - 2, 500 mm and humidity is high all year round.

Religion

The different types of religion in Malaysia reflects the variety of races living there. Islam is the official religion but Buddhism, Hinduism, Christianity and other religions are practiced freely.

Islam is practiced predominantly by the Malays. Most of the Chinese believe in Buddhism and Taoism but others are Christians. Hinduism is mostly practiced by the region's Indian population. Many indigenous people have converted to Christianity but others still practiced animism.

People

Malaysia is a multi-racial country with a population of approximately 19.9 million. This consist of the main racial groups of Malays, Chinese, Indians, and a very diverse group of indigenous people in Sabah and Sarawak. The Orang Asli are the aboriginal people of Peninsular Malaysia, with an estimated population of over 60,000 and who, for the most part, still lead a simple yet fascinating lifestyle. Sabah's indigenous groups include the Kadazan/Dusun, Bajau, Murut, Rungus, Lotud, Orang Sungei, Kadayan, Bisaya and many other subgroups. The Ibans forms the largest indigenous group in Sarawak, the rest are the Bidayuhs, the Melanaus and the Orang Ulus.

Entry Regulations

Visitors must be in possession of national passports or other internationally recognized travel documents, endorsed for travelling in Malaysia and with a validity period of at least six months beyond the time of stay allowed in Malaysia.

Visitors on social and business visit purposes are to be guided by the following visa requirements:

Visa Exemption:

No visas are required for citizens of Commonwealth countries (except Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka), British Protected Persons or citizens of the Republic of Ireland and citizens of Switzerland, Netherlands, San Marino and Liechtenstein.

Three Months Visa-Free Visit

Citizens of Albania, Austria, Algeria, Argentina, Bahrain, Belgium, Czech Republic, Republic of Slovakia, Denmark, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kuwait, Luxembourg, Lebanon, Morocco, Norway, Oman, Qatar, Spain, South Korea, Republic of Bosnia, Sweden, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, United States of America, United Arab Emirates and Yemen are eligible for three months visa free visit.

One Month Visa-Free Visit

Applicable to citizens of ASEAN countries.

14-Days Visa-Free Visit

Citizens of Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Libya and Syria are eligible for 14-days visa free visit.

7-Days Visa-Free Visit

Applicable to citizens of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Republic of Belarus, Bulgaria, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakstan, Kirghizstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldavia, Romania, Russia, Tajikistan, Ukraine and Uzbekistan. Air travellers on transit (not exceeding 72 hours) are eligible for a visa-free visit. As regulations may change from time to time, it is advisable to check with the nearest Malaysian Embassy before your departure.

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Last updated : 06/03/01 1736hrs